Three Years

It is a freeze-frame in my mind - that moment three years ago that we stood holding hands in the humid Florida heat while exchanging vows. Time stood still that day as I married the girl I met in seventh grade. Even now it seems as though the moment just passed. Unfortunately, life doesn’t stand still and the increasingly precious moments speed by beyond our control. As is life, our third year of marriage went by as fast as the first and second years. Though it passed with disquieting pace, it was filled with many wonderful memories. Memories that young men are too foolish to appreciate. Memories that middle-aged husbands reminisce about with friends over a cold beer. Memories that old men cling to when their days are few.

Holding Hands Holding hands during our wedding.

Last year, I concluded my thoughts on our second year of marriage with:

I don’t know what the future holds. If it is anything like these past two years, then it will be a crazy ride. I know one thing, though - we’ll tackle it like we always have: side-by-side and hand-in-hand.

Hand In Hand

That statement was proven true in short order. The last year was a crazy ride and we did it hand-in-hand. Except this time, our hands had a little more to hold.

Hand In Hand Another pair of shoes.

I previously stated that our wedding day was the best of my life. However, that designation was replaced by June 22, 2013. On that day we found out that my wife was pregnant. It was something that we had both talked about for years - something that we had desperately wanted over the preceding year. It was now a reality. And with that positive test result, our whirlwind year was underway. Unfortunately for June 22, three little words made the first day of October the best of my life - “It’s a boy!”.

It's a boy It’s a boy.

The following months were filled with nursery preparation, doctor visits, and a quiet panic about whether I had any business being a parent. We also faced a scare of premature birth at 33 weeks. Luckily, our son channeled the determination of his mother and held out until he was full term. My new “best day ever” was February 21, 2014 when our son Everett was born.

Babies The new family.

Every day since his birth has been the best of my life, all filled with so many different memories. Waking up every hour-and-a-half in the first weeks. The first time he grabbed my finger. The first time he opened his eyes and looked at me. The first time he smiled at me. The times he fell asleep on my chest. And for every one I mention, there are countless others. I’ve tried my best to capture those fleeting memories, much like a child grabbing fireflies in a jar - fearful that she’ll forget how bright the light once shone.

As meaningful as my personal memories have been with my son, the most rewarding have been those involving my wife. Her unconditional love and affection for our son melt my heart. The best my inadequate words can hope to convey is that seeing the person you love become the parent you envisioned is one of the best treasures in life. I cannot wait to see what our fourth year of marriage brings.

Though a picture may contain the equivalent of a thousand words, this one contains my world.

world My world.

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Everett Hines Gibbs

I hope you will indulge me in a short story. Almost 30 years ago, a boy was born in Oklahoma. Ten days later, a girl was born in Germany.

Babies

Fate made their paths cross in the 7th grade. They were best of friends. Unfortunately, the boy had to move away in 10th grade and they lost touch.

Babies

After three years apart, fate would once again force their paths to cross while at college. The boy (finally) asked the girl out in October of their freshman year.

Babies

Nine years later, the boy asked the girl to marry him. She said yes.

Babies

The boy and girl were wed following a two-year engagement.

Babies

After two years, the boy and girl learned their family would grow.

Babies

One week ago, the boy and girl finally met their new son. Everett Hines Gibbs.

Babies

That is the short story of how the boy’s world grew from one to two.

Babies

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Thank You and a Hiatus

As the drama surrounding the United States government shutdown escalated last week, I thought back to last year’s presidential election. Unrelated to politics, I found myself almost shocked to think that nearly a year had passed since I was at home with my wife watching the debates between President Obama and Governor Romney. As my mind wandered, I was overwhelmed at the rate and magnitude of change over the preceding year.

During this time in 2012, I was fighting internal doubt and frustration while trying to complete my dissertation in time for a December graduation. I was also a mere 28 years of age, so thoughts of life’s brevity were still obscured by youthful ignorance. My wife and I had only began to discuss having children, meaning our biggest worry revolved around who was making dinner. Fast forward to today, and everything has changed.

I completed my Ph.D. in December, and have worked since January as a postdoctoral research fellow. I am filled with confidence and excitement because I get to work on really cool problems with really smart people. I turned 29 this past March, so of course I began to think about 30, which were really just thoughts about life writ large. My wife and I learned in June that we were going to have a baby sometime in late February or early March of 2014. Things are definitely much different than in 2012.

All of this led me to today. I’ve run this website for over two years, with daily postings starting over 21 months ago. I’ve posted some 920 stories, of which 892 have occurred on 652 consecutive days. The site has been visited by nearly 50,000 people, with over 35% originating from outside the United States. A few reviews and personal stories I did were very popular, with one post reaching over 10,000 page views. I have even been contacted by Facebook to update a tutorial I posted because it was ranked fairly high. All of the above far exceeded my expectations when I began this experiment in late 2011. Needless to say, it has been a very fun experience.

Despite all of the positives, I will no longer publish this website in its current form. There are many reasons for this decision.

Firstly, I haven’t enjoyed doing it for several months. Trying to find something to share everyday feels like a burden, and I simply don’t care about most of the subject matter. That is why the site has been dominated by linked posts instead of original writing.

Secondly, no one really cares. I started the site because I wanted to share things I found cool in a voice that hopefully resonated with visitors. In reality, the site is nothing more than a version of what many were already doing - that is copying the Daring Fireball format of linked posts with a bit of commentary. The site does not offer anything new, and so it is largely a wasted effort. Stated another way, the site is yet another place that does nothing but add to the vacuum of soulless internet garbage.

This leads to my final reason. There is no clearer motivation than life’s nagging reminder of one’s mortality. I want to do things in life that matter. I want to do things that will make my friends and family proud. I admire my wife because she had many opportunities to sell-out in medical school by choosing a field that would make her rich. Instead, she chose one of the relatively lower paying fields (pediatrics) because advocating for children was her passion. In the past, she has volunteered at “free” clinics, served on various boards, and worked in Peru for month where she served poor children. Most recently, she has focused on abuse prevention and awareness. I could not be more proud of her. However, the light of her generosity has illuminated the inadequacies of my own life. I am in a fairly rare position for Oklahoma by having an advanced degree and not immediately leaving. I have been afforded a standing in our society that, whether deserved or not, has the potential to open many doors. I want to open doors that positively affect people. This site is not one of those things.

I might write here occasionally when there is something important to say, although those times will likely be infrequent. In the meantime, I will spend my efforts on a few projects that I think are worth my time. I have a mobile application that aims to improve the efficiency of pediatric medical professionals. I also have a few more application ideas that I want to pursue. In addition, I am working on launching a website that will focus on politics - not in the typical hyper-partisan way, but in a way that illustrates how our lives are shaped by our leaders’ decisions. Finally, I want to pursue an idea on improving education in Oklahoma. The idea is to focus on the time between when school lets out and when it starts anew the following day. The idea might broadly be considered a Variety Care for education.

In parting, I want to offer thanks to everyone who has visited and given feedback. I have really enjoyed interacting with people I might not otherwise have met. I especially welcomed when my ideas were challenged and debated. You’ll hear from me in the future when I feel I have something meaningful to contribute. Until then, I’ll be taking a much needed hiatus - thank you, all.

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Visualizing The Red River Rivalry

On Saturday, October 12th, the Oklahoma Sooners and Texas Longhorns will meet in the Cotton Bowl for the 108th edition ofRed River Rivalry. Unlike many past match-ups, Texas is down this year. With a record of 3-2, and several poor performances, most analysts aren’t expecting the Longhorns to provide much competition for the Sooners. As a Sooners fan, I always try to remain skeptical of such talk.

One of the great improvements this year for Oklahoma is their defense. I began poking around the statistics and noticed that Oklahoma has not faced a team ranked better than 79th in total offense. This was particularly intriguing because Texas is ranked 39th. I began to wonder, beyond the “anything can happen in a rivalry” wild card, if there were any statistics that might point to a closer game than most expect.

First, I looked at the offensive performance by each team: scoring, total yards, passing yards, and rushing yards. I took both team’s output in each game and normalized them by their respective opponent’s average in the category of interest. This value was found by subtracting the opponent’s average from either the Oklahoma or Texas output, and then dividing by the opponent’s average. For instance, if Oklahoma’s opponent surrendered an average of 14 points and the Sooners scored 28, then the normalized value would be unity. The same was done for each team’s defensive performance.

Positive (negative) values indicate a performance that exceeds an opponent’s offensive (defensive) average, while the opposite sign indicates a performance that lags an opponent’s average. In other words, positive (negative) values indicate a “good” offensive (defensive) performance, while negative (positive) values indicate a “bad” offensive (defensive) performance. The relative level of “good” or “bad” increases with increasing magnitude.

Offense Offensive production from Texas and Oklahoma. Values are normalized by their opponents’ respective average.

In looking at the offensive plot, Texas has more positive scoring performances than Oklahoma (4/5 vs. 3/5), while Oklahoma has the more impressive relative single scoring output. Passing performance illustrates a rather stark difference between Oklahoma and Texas. Outside of the one particularly strong outing from the Sooners, their passing output has been relatively poor when compared to Texas. Generally, the opposite is true for rushing.

On the defensive side, the Oklahoma Sooners have more impressive defensive outings than Texas in all categories. This is especially evident in scoring and pass defense.

Defense Defensive production from Texas and Oklahoma. Values are normalized by their opponents’ respective average.

However, these figures can be misleading. On offense, the positive (negative) outliers can arise from playing weak (strong) opponents. The opposite is true for defense. To account for this, I added a weighting term to the normalized values that took into account the opponent’s national rank (out of 123 teams) in each respective category. The idea was to penalize each team for poor performances against weak opponents and to reward good performances against strong opponents. The weighting procedure is very ad-hoc1, prescribed for offense as:

weight = 1 - (opponent ranking-1)/123

if (normalizedValue > 0):
    normalizedValue = weight*normalizedValue
else:
    normalizedValue = (1-weight)*normalizedValue

and for defense as:

weight = 1 - (opponent ranking-1)/123

if (normalizedValue > 0):
    normalizedValue = (1-weight)*normalizedValue
else:
    normalizedValue = weight*normalizedValue

The hope in applying a weighting factor is that the spread among data points, and thus the subsequent interpretatios, are more meaningful.

Offense Weighted Offensive production from Texas and Oklahoma. Values are normalized by their opponents’ respective average and weighted by their opponents’ respective rank.

Indeed, examination of the offensive data shows that the spread of each category is reduced. We see that Oklahoma isn’t a scoring juggernaut like in the days of Sam Bradford and Landry Jones. Comparatively, Texas has performed slightly better than the Sooners. Total yards are fairly similar, while the components of the total are different. Oklahoma’s offense appears to thrive in the running game, while the Longhorn’s offense is driven by passing.

Defense Weighted Defensive production from Texas and Oklahoma. Values are normalized by their opponents’ respective average and weighted by their opponents’ respective rank.

Likewise, inspection of the weighted defensive data indicates that Oklahoma remains ahead of Texas, although the differences aren’t as drastic as they originally appeared. We see that Oklahoma is largely on the “good” side of each defensive category. A lone exception is the running game, where the Sooners are less consistent. Texas, on the other hand, seems to yield relatively more yards, with the bulk of the damage coming from their opponents running game.

So, where does that leave us? It would seem that the Sooner’s offensive strength plays directly into the Lonhgorn’s defensive weakness. I would expect Texas to attempt making Oklahoma a one-dimensional passing team. Conversely, the Sooner’s defensive strength matches the Longhorn’s offensive strength. I imagine that the Longhorn’s will try and run the ball in an effort to take pressure off of their quarterback.

My bet is that the Sooners shut down the Texas running game and force a few turnovers in the passing game. I also expect the Sooners to have success running the ball. I am picking the Sooners to win, although in a closer game than most expect2.


  1. This should probably be rethought. I neither have the time or interest right now to do this. 

  2. Neither team is very explosive, so I expect a lower-scoring affair than in recent years. Barring a lot of turnovers, my bet is that the spread won’t be nearly as large as some think. 

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